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Home: Properties arrow Tourism in Le Marche region

Tourism in Le Marche region

Wherever you may find yourself in Le Marche, the Apennine mountains are never very far away. They form the region's western border and offer some of its finest scenery as well as providing a home for some of Italy's most fascinating wildlife. The Parco Naturale dei Monti Sibillini, in the southwest corner, is the region's largest park, spreading over 40 km of mountain peaks and continuing westwards into Umbria.
The landscape of Le Marche ranges from undulating agricultural fields and vine clad slopes to snow-capped mountains and dramatic gorges. Il Vigneto is situated in an area of natural beauty, close to the majestic Sibillini mountain range and the Sibillini National Park which provides the most breathtaking scenery in central Italy. The mountains are calcareous in origin, producing the magnificent Frassasi limestone caves. There are 20 peaks over 2000 m and several ski resorts in the area. The whole area is a walker's paradise with many mountain paths, guided walks if you require, and a stunning array of wild flowers to be seen. Le Marche is rich in historical-artistic and cultural heritage which has been preserved and unlike its neighbours Umbria and Tuscany, is relatively undiscovered and still unspoiled by tourism. Every small hilltop village in this region has a beautiful church and a welcoming bar, but more than that, throughout summer and autumn each village has its local festa or sagra. This is a time to celebrate the year’s hard work and is usually based on produce from mushrooms, sausages, fruit, wine or chestnuts depending on the season. It is a time for eating and drinking, processions, music and dancing.
The Marche region has 180 kilometres of Adriatic coastline and a host of inviting seaside resorts.
There are basically two types of beach resort in the Marche. First there are the bigger centres with a lively atmosphere, busy nightlife, plenty of visitors from abroad and nose-to-tail hotels along the prom. Then there are the many more smaller resorts with less spectacular beaches and more rented villa/apartment accommodation rather than hotels. These places are often filled for the short summer season by Italian families, often inland marchigiani, who return each year. A couple of places that don't fit into either category are the resorts nestling under the rocky peninsular of Monte Conero. Here you'll find rocky coves and white limestone cliffs totally unlike any other stretch of the Adriatic. Le Marche can boast one of the highest number of Blue Flag beaches of any region in Italy. The prestigious Blue Flag is awarded  by the Foundation for Environmental Education to environmentally well-kept beaches across Europe. The important "eco-label" is given to sites that meet strict criteria including water quality, environmental management, safety and other services.

Riviera del Conero and Monte Conero

Monte Conero

Monte Conero, a paradise in the south of Ancona, is truly unique. Here you'll find rock caves and white limestone cliffs totally unlike any other of the Adriatic, from Trieste in the north to the southern "spur" of Italy, the Gargano - a much more Mediterranean experience. The panoramic road winding along the coast offers a spectacular view of many pebble beaches of the Riviera del Conero. The area is a regional natural park and a web of signed trails up to the peak. On the top, remains of Palaeolithic settlement dating back 100,000 years have been discovered - the earliest signs of human presence in the region.
Monte Conero, just south of Ancona provides the only really rugged coastline in the Marche, rising spectacularly out of the sea to a height of just over 500 metres. It's position half way up the Italian peninsula has made it an important meeting point for many species of northern and southern European maritime flora, including rarities like Bellevalia dubia, Fumana arabica and Aspodeline liburnica. The park boasts over a thousand species of wild plants, as well as a rich bird life. And if that's not enough, the views out over the sea are stunning.

The Gola della Rossa and Frasassi regional park

Frasassi caves 

The Gola della Rossa and Frasassi regional park, in the area of Genga, is a series of towering limestone gorges which provide the rocky habitat for several golden eagles as well as peregrine falcons and eagle owls. Frasassi caves, discovered in 1971 by a group of speleologists from Ancona and opened to the public in 1974, today represent one of the major tourist attractions in the Marche region. The Frasassi caves, in the heart of the area, are the longest and among the most interesting in Italy with a 240 m high central chamber which is  large enough to comfortably hold Milan cathedral. The Frasassi area is considerated by experts to be one of the most important in Europe. The caves have been discovered since few decennia. Inside, the bigger cavities present a spectacle of extraordinary beauty in the world built by nature during the centuries.

Arcevia 

Arcevia 

Arcevia is a noble town stands high up on a ridge in the Apennine foothills of the central Marche. Once you have twisted your way up to the top, the relative grandeur of the place comes as something of a surprise with several smart palazzi lining the main Corso Mazzini. Benign Piazza Garibaldi, half way along, is presided over by the town hall, topped by its 14th century tower. On the opposite side, a balcony under the arcades gives you a grandstand view out over the mountains to the south.
The artistic high spot here is the church of San Medardo, half way up Corso Mazzini, where you can see two dramatically framed masterpieces by Luca Signorelli, painted while he was living here between 1507 and 1508, as well as an altarpiece by Giovanni della Robbia (1513).

Fano

 Carnevale di Fano

Fano is the small town, famous one for his carnival, the most ancient of Italy.
Fano was the Roman colony of Fanum Fortunae took its name from a noted temple to the goddess of Fortune that once stood here. Still today Fortune reigns, but in the Christian guise of one of the town's four patrons, San Fortunato. In Roman times the place was both an important port and crossroad where the Via Flaminia from Rome met the main coastal route. Today it is an alluring small seaside resort that doubles as a busy fishing port with an attractive old centre.
The Arco di Augusto, a splendid Roman triumphal arch (below), provides a fitting gateway to the town. It was erected in 2 AD under orders of the Roman Emperor Augustus as part of his ambitious project to smarten up the Empire's road network and marks the arrival of the Via Flaminia on the shores of the Adriatic; on the wall of the church on the right outside the arch is a 16thC bas- relief showing the arch as it was originally built.
From here the main Via Arco di Augusto sets a course through the old centre (if you keep following the road it will eventually take you across the railway tracks to finish on the Sassonia beach).
At the main crossroad in the centre turn right up Corso Matteotti to arrive at central Piazza XX Settembre decorated with a whimsical 16thC fountain topped by the goddess Fortune (above/top). Among the fine buildings flanking the square stands the Palazzo Malatesta with a remarkable courtyard and loggia known as the Corte Malatestiana. The palace holds the town's Museo Civico and Pinacoteca, a carpetbag collection including some fine Renaissance medals and paintings by Guercino, Guido Reni and Michele Giambono.

Serra de’ Conti

Serra de' Conti
 
Serra de’ Conti is a small medieval town, built on high walls which surround elegant lofty palazzi, is one of the most charming towns in the central Marche. Search out intimate Piazza Leopardi, overlooked by a fine octagonal tower, then wander the narrow streets and hidden corners of this opulent small place.
At Serra de' Conti, there is tourist accommodation available in hotels, farm holiday, farmhouse, residence self-catering accommodation, b&b, rooms for rent, holiday homes, camp sites and tourist villages.

Urbino

Urbino 
 
Urbino is a walled city in the Marche region in Italy, a World Heritage Site notable for a remarkable historical legacy of independent Renaissance culture, especially under the patronage of Federico da Montefeltro, duke of Urbino from 1444 to 1482. The modest Roman town of Urvinum Mataurense ("the little city on the river Mataurus") became an important strategic stronghold in the Gothic Wars of the 6th century, captured in 538 from the Ostrogoths by the Roman general Belisarius, and frequently mentioned by the historian Procopius. The town, nestled on a high sloping hillside, retains much of its picturesque medieval aspect, only slightly marred by the large car parks below the town. The main attraction of Urbino is the Palazzo Ducale, begun in the second half of the 15th century by Federico II da Montefeltro. It houses the Galleria Nazionale delle Marche, one of the most important collections of Renaissance paintings in the world. Raphael was born at Urbino, where his family's house is a museum-shrine. Other interesting buildings include Palazzo Albani (17th century), Palazzo Odasi and Palazzo Passionei. The Albornoz Fortress (known locally as La Fortezza), built by the eponymous Papal legate in the 14th century. In 1507-1511, when the Della Rovere added a new series of walls to the city, the rock was enclosed in them. It is now a public park. The Duomo (cathedral) is a church founded in 1021 over a 6th century religious edifice. The 12th century plan was turned 90 degrees from the current one, which is a new construction also started by Federico II and commissioned to Francesco di Giorgio Martini, author of the Ducal Palace. Finished only in 1604, the Duomo had a simple plan with a nave and two aisles, and was destroyed by an earthquake in 1789. The church was again rebuilt by the Roman architect Giuseppe Valadier, the works lasting until 1801. The new church has a typical neo-classicist appearance, with a majestic dome. It houses a San Sebastian from 1557, an Assumption by Carlo Maratta (1701) and the famous Last Supper by Federico Barocci (1603–1608).

Serra San Quirico

Serra San Quirico 

The municipality of Serra San Quirico stretches on the right bank of the river Esino, climbing the steep mountains. This route allows you to discover one of the most beautiful romanesque abbeys in the region and to enjoy wonderful views of the Appennines from the castles. A town apparently so short of building space within its medieval walls that its early inhabitants built out over the streets, creating picturesque covered roads or "copertelle". The town's Map Museum (Cartoteca Storica Regionale) holds a collection of regional maps dating back to the 1200s.
Another good reason to visit here is to try the town's calcioni pastries with their curious sweet and sour cheese and lemon filling.

Morro d’Alba

Morro d???Alba

The pleasing old part of Morro d'Alba is embraced by an escarpment wall dating back to the second half of the15th century. Atop these walls runs a remarkable walkway pierced by porticoes that offers ever-changing views of the delightful countryside around.
There is another excellent reason to stop here - to try the celebrated local red wine, Lacrima di Morro d'Alba, a heady garnet brew with an elegant finish, definitely a cut above a mere country wine.

 Castelplanio

Castelplanio 

Castelplanio is a comune (municipality) in the Province of Ancona in the Italian region Marche, located about 35 km southwest of Ancona. Castelplanio, a little town located in the green hills, represents a fortified medieval town, today famous for the production of high-quality Verdicchio wine and spumante. In addition to its location and panoramic single Castelbellino offers its walls and the church of San Marco that stands in the centre of the village. In Castelbellino and downstream in its fractions no shortage anniversaries, fairs and festivals like the Feast of oak held in the hamlet seventh station last August which proposes always new and interesting attractions in addition to the typical local dishes. Another feast we find the Easter Monday in the hamlet Pantiere where an entire town is illuminated in celebration. Surely not to be missed. But the most precious thing of Castelbellino is the Christmas tree that is created under the castle and eregge throughout the hill below to several hundred metres, so that was appointed the Christmas tree largest in Italy. You can admire both closely both from several kilometers away. Its ignition occurs the first day of December to be switched off after the Epiphany. The event the tree Christmas is not to seize the moment. Main sights are the abbey of S. Benedetto (13th- 14th cent.) and the church of S. Sebastiano (14th cent.).

Corinaldo

Corinaldo 

Corinaldo is a remarkably pretty fortified hill town, all of a medieval piece. It has some of the best-preserved 15th C defensive walls in the Marche. Walk along long stretches of the battlements and admire the sweeping views. It's worth wondering up and down the narrow stepped streets, and visiting the shrine to St Maria Goretti, the town's own 20th C saint, murdered in 1902 at the age of 12 by a would-be rapist whom she resisted. She was canonized in 1950 as a martyr.
The town is in Verdicchio wine country and the local cooperative winery, Val di Nevola, produces some excellent value bottles.
It is famous for the local polenta feast.

Poggio San Marcello

Poggio San Marcello 

Poggio San Marcello born around the homonymous church of the XII century. It has ancient origins and some interesting artistic and architectural monuments which belong to different periods, in particular to the medieval period, when the country was part of the “protectorate” of the closest big town Jesi. Poggio San Marcello is one of the smallest countries in the province of Ancona and remains slightly hidden from view, covered by hills that make it a unique and particular village. Despite being a small village, this does not prevent us from having attractions to visit both tourist and cultural. To visit is the church of Our Lady of emergency dating back to 1500, the church of St. Nicholas from Bari, the church of Saint Marcello dating back to the twelfth century and the church of Santa Maria del Monte dating from before 1100. We find the wonderful palace of Municipality and the theatre which is worth really penalty visit. But we can not forget the wonderful walls that culminates with the beautiful port of entry to the country. The whole country is made up of small they do go back in time, so that in the Christmas period is here made a living crib that thanks to the characteristic of the village is an event unique in its kind. the whole country seems to return to live in the past and its people with him. In May, then held the event called Poggio in Fiore with the village that everything becomes a succession of scents and colors for many exhibitors taking part.

Castelleone di Suasa

Castelleone di Suasa 

Castelleone di Suasa is a town and comune within the Province of Ancona, in Le Marche region of Italy. It is well known for the archaeological park of Suasa, an ancient Roman town.
Rising on a hill near the river Cesano, Castelleone di Suasa is also called "green town" because of its flourishing nursery activity. Below the medieval castle there are the remains of the Roman municipality of Suasa, that rose along the branch of the via Flaminia that lead to Sena Gallica (Senigallia). Since 1987 the Archaeological Superintendence of the Region of Le Marche, has started a programme of excavations that has allowed the discovery of the ancient basalt street, the commercial forum, two sepulchre areas, the amphitheatre and, above all, the rich patrician dwelling that has become Archaeological Park.
The "Forgiveness Feast", the most important religious event of the year, takes place during the spring season, followed by the Fair on the successive Monday.
The onion was one of the most important foods in the local economy (the "Castelleonesi" were famous as "onion growers"), and therefore for some years now the appointment of major attraction has become the Festa della Cipolla ("Onion Festival"), on the first weekend in September: the feast foresees itinerant shows and gastronomic stands with curious and succulent recipes based on onion.

Fabriano

Fabriano 

Fabriano appears to have been founded in the early Middle Ages by the inhabitants of a small Roman town 5 km (3 mi) south at Attiggio (Latin Attidium), of which some slight remains and inscriptions are extant. Fabriano itself was one of the earliest places in Europe to make high-quality paper on an industrial scale, starting in the 13th century, and the town even today has a reputation for fine watermarked paper. This led to Fabriano's prosperity in the Late Middle Ages and the Renaissance, and was also one of the factors that led to the establishment of nearby Foligno in Umbria as the one of the earliest printing centers in Italy in the 15th century, from 1470 onwards.
Fabriano's wealth and commitment to the fine arts in the late medieval period have left it with many monuments. The Cathedral of St. Venantius (14th century, rebuilt in 1607-1617). From the Baroque restoration are the stucco decoration of the interior and the canvasses by Gregorio Preti, Salvator Rosa, Giovan Francesco Guerrieri, Giuseppe Puglia and Orazio Gentileschi. To the original Cathedral belong the polygonal apse, the cloister and the St. Lawrence Chapel, with frescoes from of Allegretto di Nuzio (c. 1360). Also important are the frescoes with histories of the Holy Cross by the Folignate Giovanni di Corraduccio (1415).
Famous natives of Fabriano is Gentile da Fabriano, 15th century painter, whose most famous work, an oil painting of the Epiphany, is in the Uffizi Gallery in Florence.
Its location on the main highway and rail line from Umbria to the Adriatic make it a mid-sized regional center in the Apennines. Fabriano is the headquarters of the giant appliance maker Indesit.

 

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